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Hammer of god

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Hammer Of God Video

Jimmy Wang Yu, Lo Lieh in Hammer of God 1976 hammer of god

Hammer Of God - Stöbern in Kategorien

In den Warenkorb. Still a big difference between an "a" and an "H" and the overall 20,,,,,,, iterations for the key-space at , So that you know, I'm assuming what an attacker would have to assume if he knew some of what you know as odd as that may sound. Versand nach:. So just use Base 36 - it's the same thing.

Hammer Of God Video

Jimmy Wang Yu, Lo Lieh in Hammer of God 1976

Hammer of the Gods 5 in Near Mint condition. Hammer of God 3 in Near Mint condition. Last one. Hammer of God: Butch 2 in Near Mint condition.

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Arthur C. And I feel nothing. Feb 25, Tom Meyer rated it really liked it. Vintage Clarke: fast-paced, fun, clever, occasionally mischievous, full of interesting speculation, and scientifically sound.

Why isn't this a movie? Good sci-fi novel - reads very quickly. Plot is exactly what you would expect from Clarke. Great hard sci-fi and one of the best works of fiction about impact avoidance.

A Few Words on Fiction about Impact Avoidance Being able to prevent an impact event, is a major step in the growth of a civilization, is a good representative example of how nihilism and such negative ways of thinking aren't quite useful, and underlines how just working towards progress is the way.

Af Great hard sci-fi and one of the best works of fiction about impact avoidance. After the read, it seemed like the best work of fiction I had 'come across' about impact avoidance, even with all its faults.

However, the forums indicated that The Hammer of God is also a good entry in the subgenre. Also THoG is written by the big man Clarke himself, and seems more widely known with 3.

That article itself, though limited by Wikipedia restrictions, covers A LOT of the stuff I might otherwise have put here.

Good fiction about realistic utopia is relatively rare and the excuse I've heard is that, by definition, it is difficult to create interesting stories about conflict and challenges in a utopian civilization.

Going through the descriptions of the boatloads of books out there, it seems most writers find it difficult to just create realistic interesting stories.

Hence, dystopian fiction is much more common. Too common. Unnecessarily common and lazily thought out, if you ask me. Some of the recent surveying of fiction I have done, is with a rudimentary plan to understand the history of and maybe contribute to, utopian fiction in some way.

Taking care of health, work and family duties being the priority, reviews etc. The society is somewhat utopian in THoG. And although the setting is secondary to plot, and the choice of the setting seems less due to Clarke's interest in writing an utopia and more due to contemporary predictions about Comet Swift-Tuttle, he still has created a pretty interesting utopia, albeit justifiably?

Apart from the very intriguing socio-political and religious bits, the discussion of various futuristic technologies as well as speculations about fundamental physics force fields, 'restricted' wormholes and the verified one — gravitational waves is succinct.

From Lagrangian points to composition of asteroids, Clarke also describes real concepts with accuracy and clarity. The action and suspense is also quite entertaining.

However, I think Robert Singh's life events took too much, space sounds punny, I know, I know , without adding much for the reader.

A septuagenarian and residing away from his place of birth, he also has quite a few parallels to Clarke. Clarke might just have indulged a bit there.

There's quite some lost potential there, I think. Also, I think an advanced society as THoG's would have got a more robust plan, though the unexpected delay in the asteroid's detection might explain away that argument.

Though, I don't think there was even a mention of an insurance plan - like the cave construction in Deep Impact movie.

It is an interplanetary civilization in the book, granted, but Clarke missed quite a few aspects of the scenario, I'd say. Compared to Moonfall, the action also is quite straightforward and less intense, and the futuristic setting also doesn't quite compensate for that, considering a cinematic view.

So, overall both the books have different strengths and weaknesses, and I like both of them quite equally. Moonfall might have a slight edge due to its more intricate story and the near future setting.

This was my first read of a Clarke book. The language was good but never quite spectacular IMHO. Here's an interesting article: io9.

Contrary to the words there, it's actually quite appreciative of Clarke, while providing critique of his skill.

I haven't read the earlier ASO, and having watched the movie, I have no plans to do so — however technically groundbreaking it might be, as far as the story goes, it seems inconsequential and pretentious.

BTW, I think there's a major goof in the book History of Fiction about Impact Avoidance For how important and interesting impact avoidance is, I think the science fiction community was a bit late to bring their attention to the topic.

Apart from Vernes' and Wells' somewhat related works, it seems it was Clarke himself who brought this theme to attention in 's Rendezvous with Rama.

Though, from its wiki summary, I can tell I came across one surprising find, which well might be the earliest novel to discuss impact avoidance — 's Dhoomketu by Indian astrophysicist-cum-writer Jayant Narlikar Indians might know of Narlikar from his alt-history story - 'The Adventure' - in one of the English school textbooks.

Then there's the Sean Connery movie Meteor. The Acknowledgement section in The Hammer of God is detailed, and there itself some of the history of the subgenre and of real impact events are discussed and so is their influence in the inception of the novel.

Lucifer's Hammer gets praise and even Meteor does, to an extent. Here's an important point though As mentioned in the book's wiki article, it was only in the s that the impact event hypothesis of the K-Pg extinction event got published, and just that pretty much led to this novel.

I had no idea that humans landed on the moon BEFORE coming anywhere close to confirming the cause of dinosaurs' extinction.

But then, considering the money spent and the geopolitical factors, it is not surprising that the moon landings happened earlier than quite a few scientific and social developments.

The subsequent conception of Deep Impact, Armageddon and even Moonfall, and general increase in awareness of such events might have also been due to the spectacular collision of Comet Shoemaker—Levy 9 with Jupiter in Feb 16, Arko rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction.

My very first Arthur C. Clarke novel and it really gave me a thrilling ride within our Solar system with vivid details and his praiseworthy foresight.

The beauty of a novel by Clarke , I felt is in the way he goes into the scientific details and sculpts out a thrilling tale with impressive foresight which has good chances to be realized some day in future.

The story of this novel might be a straight forward one, omitting numerous difficulties in space travel, yet the strength in his picturizatio My very first Arthur C.

The story of this novel might be a straight forward one, omitting numerous difficulties in space travel, yet the strength in his picturization infused with cutting edge scientific developments at the time of writing this novel is very appreciable.

The asteroid impact aimed to be averted in this novel will indeed be reality some day as there lurks innumerable such floating chunks having the potential of wiping all earthly living species.

Such an incident was indeed blocked by Jupiter in Not every time the coordinates will be in our favour. Already Apophis was feared to be returned from the gravitational key hole point which would miss Earth by few million kilometers only.

One day we will indeed be attempting to terraform Mars and investigate the water rich satellites Europa and Enceladus.

But a project for deflecting comets or asteroids will be very imprtant to save impacts with our home planet.

Much like how Clarke visualizes in this novel. Nov 07, Bryan Alkire added it. This one is ok. The idea was interesting and the solution ingenious.

Clarke does science well, not something that can be said of all SF writers. My main issue is that I found the narrative structure a bit jarring at times, almost seems as though the book was This one is ok.

My main issue is that I found the narrative structure a bit jarring at times, almost seems as though the book was written as a movie… On the whole I give this one a 3.

Mar 17, Jeff Johnston rated it liked it Shelves: my-library. Doesn't bore you too much with over emphasis on the science, whilst employing some nice characterisations.

Absolutely loved the Mars references to his contemporaries, H. Aug 12, Maja Shinigami rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , prose , classics , sf.

You can destroy my Kali anytime, Mr. Dec 28, Robin Pilgrim rated it really liked it. Arthur C Clarke did it again.

Apr 28, Sharon rated it liked it. An interesting scifi story about the efforts of human inhabitants of Mars to prevent an asteroid from impacting with and destroying the earth.

Various actual earth events are cited and these give the story added depth meaning. Jul 27, Karl Kindt rated it liked it Shelves: Well, at least it was coherent, unlike his previous novel.

This story is best when ACC is explaining orbital mechanics and things related to the planets.

Again he hatefully attacks all religion except Hinduism, sort of and asserts judgmental claims without support and shows he knows little about real politics, human sexuality, and women.

This was an interesting book to read. I almost wish I had read it 'way back when' it first came out. I found myself wondering if he would have changed anything prior to releasing the book if it had been written and released after Shoemaker-Levy collided with Jupiter.

It was a decent book; it held my interest throughout the entire reading. It was not a nail-biter, by any means, but it was still a fun read.

It has a lot of sections [chapters] 'building the backstory' and building up to the present. I think the author could have done a better job indicating which parts of the book were 'the past' and which were 'the present'; a couple of times I did get a little confused when reading and had to backtrack to see what I had missed.

In regard to religion - I thought the author had an interesting concept [I guess]. Christianity is the world's largest religion with over two billion adherents, followed by Islam and then Hinduism.

I could see Hinduism become the world's largest religion depending on how many converts shifted to Chrislam.

I did not fully understand how or why this religion came into existence, other than it having to do with US soldiers being exposed to Islam during the first Gulf War.

Just because they were exposed does not mean such a thing would happen, but let's not quibble. It worked for the story. It had an interesting mix of 'sci-fi stuff' in it.

Food on Earth [and the Moon and Mars] was created by reusing [recycling] human waste products to create food. Some animals were no longer alive, but they could be re-engineered and genetically modified because their entire DNA was recorded in computer banks around the world.

There is a device that you wear over your entire head and it allows you to experience recordings and incoming messages in 3D. There is no FTL travel in the book, though.

People received messages via 'spacefax' as opposed to a computer printout. People are limited to two children [although that must be limited to your current spouse as Robert is divorced and remarried; he has an adult child on Earth and two children on Mars].

There were habitats on the Moon and Mars; people lived out around Jupiter, as well. There were robots, artificial intelligences, and experimental space suits used during the Moon [Lunar?

I did find one part of the book especially 'funny'. In addition, the crew quits exercising and eats so much food that they individually put on a minimum of ten pounds each.

It just struck me as funny, that they fully gave in to the whole 'let's eat, drink, and be merry, because tomorrow we may die!

The crew was rescued by their sister ship, the Hercules. I had read the novelization of the movie Meteor 'back in the day' [in which the Russians and Americans worked together to try and stop an incoming space rock from destroying the planet].

Of course, the 'bad' reviews for Shiva Descending may discourage me from reading it. We'll see. Overall, I am glad I [finally] read this book [as I have thought about reading it for quite some time, now].

Apr 15, J. I went to the library looking for "Lucifer's Hammer"--it was out--after writing a flash fiction piece about a meteor strike and wound up picking this off the shelf for a quick read instead.

Written in , this one of Clarke's last works and it clocks in at a relatively short pages. It was actually a perfect length for the amount of story Clarke has to tell, which wasn't much.

Getting the basics out of the way, Clarke is a legendary writer, but his skills were more suited to the Golden Age of I went to the library looking for "Lucifer's Hammer"--it was out--after writing a flash fiction piece about a meteor strike and wound up picking this off the shelf for a quick read instead.

Getting the basics out of the way, Clarke is a legendary writer, but his skills were more suited to the Golden Age of Sci-Fi than what I would expect from 90's or modern Sci-Fi.

I grew up reading him and Heinlein among others so I still enjoy the slower pace and philosophical filler.

It's clear that at age 76 Clarke was more suited as a futurist than writer of gripping tales. The plot is simple, the characters are stock, and there's nothing innovative or original about how the story unfolds.

Basic premise: an asteroid is headed for Earth and will wipe out most of the population if it is allowed to hit unimpeded.

I was really hoping for a futurist's take on apocalyptic scenarios with asteroids, but this part is very thin. It's good, once in a while, to read a book that you would never chose according to your usual algorithms.

I picked this book as part of research for a short story I'm writing about Lutheran life in small-town Sweden from a century ago.

I learned about a few new things, notably about the highly efficient, low-maintenance ceramic stoves that most Swedes use instead of fireplaces or Franklin stoves.

Bo Giertz was a pastor and theologian, and this novel, consisting of three loosely-linked novellas, i It's good, once in a while, to read a book that you would never chose according to your usual algorithms.

Bo Giertz was a pastor and theologian, and this novel, consisting of three loosely-linked novellas, is concerned with the things pastors would be concerned with: two farmers suing each other over a dead cow; a young man's refusal to marry the woman he got pregnant.

I give this book only 3 stars because it never quite comes together into a compelling narrative.

The plotting is rudimentary and the characterization is minimal. Mostly, it's a bunch of people talking about God, sin, and salvation.

Giertz's real strength is in his piety and his wisdom in applying spiritual truths to everyday life.

His ability to cut through the fog of human doubt and vanity must have served him well as a pastor and I understand his devotional literature of which he wrote much was beloved by many.

I just don't think writing novels was his calling. I'd recommend this curious book for people like me with a specific research interest.

Jul 04, Jim B rated it it was amazing Shelves: christian , christian-fiction , lutheran-fiction. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. In three eras, a pastor is trying to revive the spiritual lives of his people -- to some degree with success, always relying on pietistic use of the law, always discovering freedom and peace in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In each story, there is a different facet. For example, the last section turns on the authority of Scripture.

Insight into Lutheranism in a situation where the Lutheran Church is the state church. In all three eras, there was a mission society and that was where the "revivals" g In three eras, a pastor is trying to revive the spiritual lives of his people -- to some degree with success, always relying on pietistic use of the law, always discovering freedom and peace in the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In all three eras, there was a mission society and that was where the "revivals" grew out of, while the church government -- centered in the "Cathedral Chapter" always posed a danger to what was going on.

I'd like to reread this book because there are "connections" I didn't see the first time. Bo Giertz was an atheist until he went to university and was disgusted by the egotism and selfishness of other atheists and impressed by the character of Christians.

He became a Christian, a Lutheran pastor, and the youngest bishop in Sweden. He is the Swedish C. This book is a trilogy, considered his best, a best seller in the 's.

My husband's been telling me for years I needed to read this book, as has Pastor Hill. For whatever reason, this last time Pastor told me I should read it, I decided to finally go ahead and do it.

And I'm glad I did. At times, the writing got a little flowery and overdone for my tastes, but the stories themselves were really interesting.

With the parishoners and Pastors who found themselves in error on doctrine, it was interesting to see that I could identify so many other denominations in the My husband's been telling me for years I needed to read this book, as has Pastor Hill.

With the parishoners and Pastors who found themselves in error on doctrine, it was interesting to see that I could identify so many other denominations in the errors I found myself putting notes in my books noting "Presby" or "Meth" Enjoyable read.

My hubby and Pastor were right to suggest it! Jan 30, Benjamin rated it liked it Shelves: seminary.

While I found several crisp paragraphs, theologically invigorating concepts, the narrative flow felt abrupt, jagged, and forced.

Or, maybe I just didn't feel swept away like my friends. Timing, after all, means the most for a book.

A book can come to you in the best timing, be the worst written thrashing of English, and still change your life.

I, however, will settle this time with a pocketful of pithy paragraphs which may or may not make a difference.

It was very Lutheran More nuanced than your average book of "fiction apologetics," but at times the story was cringe worthy.

The writing style was always enjoyable meaning there weren't clunky sentences , but the plot was struggling along.

Every one of the three scenes consisted of a bad person, a person who thought they were good but really aren't insert Lutheran theology here , and a guy who has been around the block enough to know better than the other two usually an older pastor who is It was very Lutheran Every one of the three scenes consisted of a bad person, a person who thought they were good but really aren't insert Lutheran theology here , and a guy who has been around the block enough to know better than the other two usually an older pastor who is saintly and drinks whiskey.

Not a great book. Probably if you aren't lutheran you'll find it annoying. And if you are Lutheran you probably don't want to read about Lutherans in Sweeden or wherever it took place.

Feb 03, Glenn Crouch rated it it was amazing Shelves: theology. Whilst it took me a little while to get into and to "adjust" to the Scandinavian background of which I must admit I have very limited knowledge , I thoroughly enjoyed this book and do highly recommend it to fellow Pastors.

Admittedly and naturally it has a strong Lutheran emphasis - but as a Lutheran Pastor, I did enjoy that : It was inspiring, thought-provoking, challenging and so much more.

I found it very easy to relate to the various characters even given the cultural and time period diffe Whilst it took me a little while to get into and to "adjust" to the Scandinavian background of which I must admit I have very limited knowledge , I thoroughly enjoyed this book and do highly recommend it to fellow Pastors.

I found it very easy to relate to the various characters even given the cultural and time period differences. I have much to dwell upon - which is good!

Jan 07, Matthew Mitchell rated it it was amazing. So glad I read it this month. View 1 comment. May 15, Rich rated it it was amazing.

Good stories with appropriate law and gospel. Rare combination. Mar 28, Shawn rated it liked it.

Introduction In this well-written novel, Bo Giertz deploys a myriad of characters to examine many of the religious doctrines that have historically created dissension in the Christian church.

The cool thing about this novel is that Giertz uses his characters to unveil the absurdities of both sides of extremist positions.

We see God laying foundations of faith through repetitive generations against the shifty, slothful, arrogant, and wanton human resistance.

Humans belabor themselves way too much in creating doctrines, rules, sin-lists, theology, and ritual, instead of simply absorbing the real messages of Christ, which are love, forgiveness, and healing.

Following the death of Jesus and the Apostles, theology solidified into the most popular or most prevalent forms. Orthodoxy is quite simply the consolidation of opinion over time.

As a result, the spectrum of denominations span from Protestantism, seeking inspiration directly from Jesus and the Apostles, to Catholicism, which treats the revelations of Bishops and other religious figures as augmentations to the Word.

This term enlightens us to our own tendency to solidify widespread beliefs into orthodoxy in our own time. In the introduction, Hans Andrae rails against the diversity of such early 20th century movements as Pentecostalism or Liberation Theology, not embracing the fact that religion evolves.

However, as proof that it does evolve, we see today a Pope of the Liberation Theology persuasion. What if religion had never evolved beyond the selling of indulgencies, burnings at the stake, or an earth-centric universe?

Just as polytheism preceded Judaism and Judaism preceded Christianity, so our perceptions and understandings of God continue to evolve.

We err to limit ourselves to static conclusions about God, as rendered by those who lived in a different time and in a different context than ourselves.

The church will suffer if we get mired in the past and are unable to gain traction when facing the new moral questions of our day. My personal experience has been that powerful spiritual experiences await us when we willingly venture among the impoverished of the world.

The character Savonius sees that what the impoverished Christian lacks in physical comforts is often overwhelmingly counteracted by a profound supernatural faith that can transcend even the most educated doctrinal convulsions expounded by any pious priest.

In this experience, Savonius is thwarted by the persistent unbelief of the dying peasant, and yet he witnesses another faithful peasant gain the conversion of the unbeliever before his final demise.

This experience opens an entire new world for Savonius, as he perceives the Essence of real Godliness and belief.

And yet these men had the strength to bleed and conquer in the war beyond the Baltic. It was to these he was now sent, and he would go forth in the power of God.

He does this by portraying Savonius as mistake prone in his newfound zeal. Savonius begins to preach with such fervor that he institutes widespread revival in the community.

The members of the parish become discomforted as peasants crowd into the pews and the church is filled to standing room only.

And yet, with literary masterfulness, Giertz lets Savonius go too far in his zeal. In preaching against elaborate self-adornment, Savonius finds that one among his congregation ceases to wear a lovely broach that she inherited from her mother.

Giertz uses this extremism to display how our enthusiasm can go too far, ultimately cycling back into sin, as pretentious self-righteousness.

Perhaps the future direction of the evolution of the church is revealed in the radicalism of its day? Grace v. You must so fully trust in Jesus that you may know that your salvation depends only on him.

But we must understand that Giertz is purposefully using a very frivolous issue here to establish a point, which the reader may view very differently later in the novel, when the sin is more egregious.

It is easy for them to cast off the display of a mere brooch as inconsequential, but when the display becomes an illegitimate child, the pastors begin to back pedal against their own doctrine.

Nevertheless, when Savonius asks the Rector and the gentry to deny themselves; and to take up the cross, he is decried as a radical preacher and branded an enemy.

Is it any different among the affluent class today? How far does one go with self-adornment? Make-up, an expensive dress, elaborate jewelry, plumed hats, wigs, hair plugs, spray tan, giant heels, nail polish, face-lifts, tummy tucks, nose jobs, boob jobs, other tissue transplants?

What will ultimately stop us from cloning ourselves to ensure a standing supply of organ transplants? Where does it all stop?

Do we deploy our actions and finances for self-adornment or for Christ? We all go too far. It is finished! And so the pastors convene to defrock Savonius for all of his passionate preaching so that everything can return to the good old days of drunkenness, cursing, gambling, adultery, and such besotted misery, without all of this call for repentance.

Actually one sees more clearly all the while, though one is looking down at the dark pools of evil in the slough of sinful corruption.

But it is important to look deeply into it, for one will otherwise imagine that it is possible to get across it by oneself.

So one makes a few hops from hummock to hummock, but is soon mired. At the very worst, one does not even dare to admit that one is stuck fast, but claims that one is already across, only because one is no longer in the company of the self-secure sinners on the farther shore.

The concept that one would do good works for the simple joy of doing them seems beyond the Rectors capacity of understanding. We should never partake of good works because we think it is something that we must do, but only for the sheer pleasure of doing them, for the enormously beautiful experience, and for keeping us closer to God.

Good works can give us a small glimpse of heaven. Those who view good works as some sort of sacrifice for debt have likely yet to experience the spiritual ecstasy and love that can accompany good works.

Unmerited grace does not mean that one should never do anything of merit. But the really cool part is the response Savonius gives when the edict comes down that he is to be reprimanded for his zeal in preaching.

This response simply lays the Gospel as bare as it can be for anyone, regardless of denomination, to see plainly.

Anyone who has been involved in ministry understands how much easier it is to love on and give attention to the little people of this world, the disenfranchised, the impoverished, those who have been abused since childhood, and those discriminated against.

The little people are so in need of love that, once one is resolved to love them, the love flows easily like water in a mighty stream.

But, the mindboggling thing that Savonius illuminates is how much harder it is to love the big people of the world.

To love those who are unreceptive, who respond to you arrogantly, who seek to belittle you, who relish in their wealth and treat your love as negligible.

How much harder it is to love and forgive in these circumstances. Savonius sees that, instead of railing against the affluent, who exploit the peasants and cage themselves within their wealth, he should be just as zealous in attempting to reach them.

The Biblical perspective differs in that the ministry of Christ was primarily to the poor, impoverished sinners. The Conscience Much ado is made in this novel about the conscience.

By the end of the novel, in his characterization of Schenstedt, Giertz seems to dismiss the conscience as negligible. This is nearly sacrilegious for a reader who communes daily with God via that wireless connection we refer to as the conscience, which is most active during prayer and meditation.

But it is directly contrary to the very heart of the freedom of the Christian man Giertz is referring to the freedom to sin.

Such things lead only to the distress of conscience — or to self-righteousness. God forbid that the poor human conscience should become stressed!

It is not misery for us to visit the sick and infirmed; nor is it misery for us to enter the prisons or travel abroad to the see the impoverished.

It is, rather, more joyful than anything else we do in life. But, in its absence, the knowledge of grace is the surrogate.

Just as one blind would lean more upon a cane than one seeing, so the element of grace must become the sole solution for one who cannot feel.

Can it say whether he died for our sakes? Can it determine whether he rose again?

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